As the clock ticks over from 8:01PM on Wednesday, February 20, time will, for sixty seconds only, read in perfect symmetry 2002, 2002, 2002, or to be more precise - 20:02, 20/02/2002. The last occasion that time read in such a symmetrical pattern was long before the days of the digital watch and the 24-hour clock - at 10.01am on 10/01/1001. And because the clock only goes up to 23.59, it is something that will never happen again.

Update: Cryo pointed out to me that 21:12 21/12/2112 was also valid... so i went to johnath's LJ to tell him but he already posted this update. :P

"UPDATE: This quote appears to be in error, come to think of it. 9:12pm, Dec. 21, 2112 will be 21:12 21/12 2112. But keep an eye on the clock anyhow - that way in 110 years you can be *really* cool by being one of the few people to see TWO such temporal symmetries."

Second Update: mod also pointed out that 11:11 11/11/1111 would have also been valid.

Third Update:

The Associated Press


(February 19, 2002 5:49 p.m. EST) - Wow! For one minute, the world will appear to be in perfect symmetry.

In a year that reads the same backward as forward, Wednesday evening will bring 60 seconds of palindromic perfection - at least for those who follow the Gregorian calendar.

Come Wednesday, the time, day, month and year will align: 8:02 p.m., Feb. 20, 2002.

Write that in military time and with numerals for the month of February and it works out to: 20:02, 02/20, 2002. In European style for the day and month it's just as balanced: 20:02, 20/02, 2002.

"A mirror day like this is a good opportunity for reflecting," said Mark Saltveit, editor of The Palindromist magazine. He is devoted to palindromes of all sorts - strings of numbers, words or sentences that read the same backward or forward.

The rare moment is drawing its share of attention: Saltveit, a standup comedian, said he already has three radio interviews lined up with European stations.

Separately, a Web site is calling for a two-minute prayer for peace to begin at the start of the palindromic moment.

And an e-mail is making the rounds touting the rare alignment - though it mistakenly says the event last happened on Jan. 10, 1001 and will never happen again.

(Actually, it happened in the year 1111 and will again in 2112).

Of course, all the excitement comes from a Western perspective, leaving aside the many other calendars that track the passage of time - Chinese, Islamic, Jewish, Ethiopian and others.

But that doesn't bother Salveit. "Occasions like this are good excuses to party," he said.

http://www.nando.com/healthscience/story/259310p-2421648c.html




No prob, even though it wasn't exactly right. :P


I'm still concerned about this. What about 11:11 11/11 1111? and 12:12 12/12 1212 and 21:12 21/12 2112 and the US has it different they would have 12:21 12/21 1221

20:02 20/02/2002 doesn't work in the US either :-D

These are the examples I thought off from the top of my head - who made this up?


11:11 11/11/1111 is valid. 12:12 12/12/1212 isn't... the point was symmetry, and 121212 != 212121 reflected over the day/month seperator. 21:12 21/12/2112 is valid and was updated. :P

They would be slightly different in other date-time formats, but we're sticking with the format started in for now. :P





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